DETERMINING THE SATURATED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY
R.J. Oosterbaan and H.J. Nijland
 
On web site www.waterlog.info
 
Copy of chapter 12 in: H.P.Ritzema (Ed.), Drainage Principles and Applications,
ILRI Publication 16, second revised edition, 1994, Wageningen, The Netherlands
 
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12. Determining the saturated hydraulic conductivity of soils         
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
12.1 Introduction
 
12.2 Definitions
 
12.3 Variability of hydraulic conductivity
      nbsp; 12.3.1.Introduction
        12.3.2 Variability within soil layers
        12.3.3. Variability between soil layers
        12.3.4. Seasonal variability and time trend
        12.3.5. Soil salinity, sodicity, and acidity
        12.3.6. Geo-morphology
 
12.4 Drainage conditions and hydraulic conductivity
        12.4.1. Introduction
        12.4.2. Unconfined aquifers
        12.4.3. Semi-confined aquifers
        12.4.4. Land slope
        12.4.5. Effective soil depth
 
12.5 Review of the methods of determination
        12.5.1. Introduction
        12.5.2. Correlation methods
        12.5.3. Hydraulic laboratory methods
        12.5.4. Small-scale in-situ methods
        12.5.5. Large-scale in-situ methods
 
12.6 Examples of small-scale in-situ methods
        12.6.1. The auger-hole method
        12.6.2. Inversed auger-hole method
 
12.7 Examples of methods using parallel drains
        12.7.1. Introduction
        12.7.2. Procedures of analysis
        12.7.3. Drains with entrance resistance, deep soil
        12.7.4. Drains with entrance resistance, shallow soil
        12.7.5. Ideal drains, medium soil depth
 
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